I see a lot of patients with hip pain. Many time, the pain comes on slowly and insidiously out of nowhere, without a fall or specific incident that the patient can blame for its onset. Recently I wrote a piece about femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and how it can be responsible for hip pain in young adults. Another common cause of hip pain in older individuals that can easily be overlooked is tearing of the abductor tendons. The hip abductors are a group of muscles on either side of the body that connect the pelvis to the thigh bone and support us when we walk, and position the legs away from the midline of the body. This action is called hip abduction and relies on the healthy function of two main hip abductor muscles, the gluteus medius and gluteus minimus. These muscles function analogously to the rotator cuff muscles in our shoulders and similarly can sustain tears at the tendinous insertion that lead to pain and weakness at the hip. The typical patient with a tear in her abductor tendon is roughly 50 to 80 years of age and will present with pain on the outer aspect of the hip over the bony prominence of what is called the greater trochanter. This is not actually the true ...