ION Clean Energy Awarded 58M To Further Develop CO2 Capture Technology

Boulder, CO /PRNewswire/ – ION Clean Energy, Inc. (ION), a leading carbon capture technology company, today announced it has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) – National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to complete a Front-End Engineering Design (FEED) study for a CO2 capture system designed for retrofit onto Nebraska Public Power District’s (NPPD) Gerald Gentleman Station (GGS), located in Sutherland, NE. ION has coupled its proven solvent-based CO2 capture technology with an exceptionally qualified design and engineering team to complete this project. Comprised of ION, NPPD, Sargent & Lundy, Koch Modular Process Systems, and Siemens, the team is moving forward to complete the FEED study for a 600-megawatt equivalent, commercial-scale CO2 capture plant. This project will provide critical data and insight into the transformative potential of ION’s CO2 capture technology when deployed at existing coal-fired power plants. This is a key milestone on the path to the commercialization of ION’s large-scale decarbonization technology. “We are pleased to be a part of this collaboration that furthers our initiative to lower greenho...

Researchers have figured out how to turn CO2 back into coal

The apps, books, movies, music, TV shows, and art are inspiring our some of the most creative people in business this month An award-winning team of journalists, designers, and videographers who tell brand stories through Fast Company’s distinctive lens In the not-too-distant future, industrial plants might start turning captured CO2 back into coal–and as old coal mines shut down, they could turn into storage vaults for the new product. Machines could shovel coal inside instead of taking it out, in a process that researchers say is something like “rewinding the emissions clock.” In a lab at RMIT University in Australia, researchers demonstrated the basics of the new process for the first time. Using liquid metal and electricity, dissolved CO2 transforms into solid flakes of carbon. The process could be used in combination with new machines that suck CO2 out of the atmosphere. “The assumption is that we’ll have to do something like that in the near future,” says Torben Daeneke, a senior lecturer at RMIT University, and one of the authors of a new study about the technology. “I think the consensus is coming now that at some point in the next few decades, once we have conditi...