We make too much and buy too much. But maybe there is a way not to

We make too much and buy too much. But maybe there is a way not to waste too much. The ragpicker of Brooklyn has an idea. The ragpicker of Brooklyn works out of a 750-square-foot storefront a few blocks east of the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway, down a mostly residential side street in Williamsburg, where Hasidim and hipsters mix. The ragpicker of Brooklyn sews in the back, behind a makeshift wall sprouting a riot of scraps. Under the pattern-cutting table there are bins of scraps of scraps, sorted by color (red and yellow and blue and black), and on one wall are shelves of Mason jars containing gumball-size scraps of scraps of scraps; up front are clothing rails, and a dressing room canopied by a lavish waterfall of castoff cuttings that flows down onto the floor like a Gaudí sand castle. The ragpicker of Brooklyn, whose name is Daniel Silverstein and whose nom de style is Zero Waste Daniel, looks like a fashion kid, which he is (or was). He is 30 and tends to dress all in black, with a black knit cap on his head, and went to the Fashion Institute of Technology and interned at Carolina Herrera and even was on a fashion reality TV show. “I prefer to think of it as Rumpelstiltskin, ...

New ghillie suit for Army snipers put to the test – News

An Army sniper wearing the current Flame Resistant Ghillie System is pictured. The new Improved Ghillie System looks to enhance the snipers’ lethality and survivability while being simpler and modular. Some Army snipers are finally getting their eyes and hands on prototypes of the Army’s new ghillie suit in “bench tests” at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla. As part of the evaluation exercise, some snipers wore models of the proposed Improved Ghillie System, or IGS, and concealed themselves in forest and arid settings. The other snipers tried to spot them from distances as far away as about 655 feet and as close as about 33 feet. Staff Sgt. Ricky Labistre, a tester and sniper section team leader with 1st Battalion, 160th Infantry Regiment of the California National Guard, said ghillie suits improve a sniper’s ability to remain camouflaged and concealed. “Anytime we can improve our survivability, it is very welcomed,” Labistre said in an Army statement. The evaluation took place for three days in November. The Army plans to buy about 3,500 ghillie suits to outfit the approximately 3,300 snipers in the service, the statement said. The Army is set to replace the current Flame Resist...