I agree that we need to take the presence of cannabidiol products in schools seriously (“CBD doesn’t belong in Minnesota schools,” editorial, Jan. 31) — both to minimize risk for young people and to address concerns from school nurses. The fact remains that CBD and medical cannabis are already in Minnesota schools. Currently, more than 500 children ages 5 to 17 are enrolled in the medical cannabis program, and others with conditions such as autism, Tourette’s syndrome and epilepsy choose high-quality CBD to manage their children’s chronic conditions. Minnesota schools allow parents to take students off-campus during school hours to give their medically fragile children their CBD or medical cannabis. School nurses are already working with students’ health care providers to ensure the safety of children who need medication during the school day and have done so since the implementation of the medical cannabis program back in 2015 and since the legalization of CBD on Jan. 1, 2020. Side effects such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome, suicidal thoughts and lethargy are just a few of the side effects our epileptic son, Kade, has endured. Kade’s CBD, which is given under the supervision of h...